Best of Vienna

Of coffee, big wheels, and a trip to Bratislava.

If you are travelling to Vienna, you need to take two things with you: time and a big appetite. Because there are plenty of scrumptious treats to sample and even more to see. The city of Vienna alone is huge, and you need more than just a day or two to explore the biggest sights. Of course, you will also want to plan enough time to stop for a bite to eat, and visitors to Vienna simply mustn’t miss out on a trip to Bratislava! After all, the city has some great things to discover as well!

Have I teleported into an open-air museum?
Art aficionados are drawn to the Museumsquartier, foodies to the Naschmarkt and bookworms to the palatial National Library. Vienna certainly does have something for everyone. A few ideas for sightseeing?

  • marvel at hundertwasser's art from the inside and outside
  • take a spin on vienna's giant ferris wheel
  • visit the circus museum at the prater
  • admire the 18th century, barowue-style national library
  • begin your explorations of the city centre at st. stephan's cathedral and delight at the astonishing architecture
  • relax and unwind in one of the many courtyard gardens
  • soak up the imperial atmosphere at schoenbrunn palace

There are countless other attractions to visit and experience; Vienna has easily enough to keep you busy for a few days or more. The city can seem like a massive open-air museum, so architecture enthusiasts will definitely get their money’s worth here.

Vienna - A gourmet's paradise
I’ve often raved about Viennese cuisine. Sure, there’s schnitzel, dumplings and Kaiserschmarren – what a treat! But if you’ve had enough of all that, you can find a diverse and extensive culinary scene with delicacies from all over the world as well. My favourite places to grab a bite:

  • das kleine café, franziskanerpl. 3, 1010 vienna. this smoky setting is where artists and wannabes gather for a tête-à-tête
  • café hawelka serves up tradition and buchtel cakes, dorotheergasse 6, 1010 vienna
  • the younger and hipper crwod will feel entirely at home in phil's, gumpendorfer st. 10, 1060 vienna
  • fancy another spot of vietnamese? just opposite phil, ramien's is the right place to go to satisfy cravings for far eastern fare
  • and fans of pick 'n' mix street food should get themselves to the vienna naschmarkt as quickly as possible

Exploring the many sides of Bratislava
As I said: don’t forget Bratislava! A visit to one country can quickly become two, and you’ll be able to cross a pair of capitals off your bucket list in one go. The little city of Bratislava can’t be compared with Vienna. Neither regal nor glamorous and not particularly trendy, either. But that’s exactly why it’s worth a visit. The picturesque old town exudes a sense of calm: the pavements are full of people gathering for a chat, and life just seems a little more leisurely. Hip cafés are starting to open, and visitors to the hilltop castle above the city enjoy a stunning view of Bratislava and the Danube. The train trip between the cities only takes an hour, and there’s a special fare that gives you free use of public transport in Bratislava as well. Another option is to travel by boat up the river Danube.
Vienna and Bratislava are an odd couple, but that may be precisely why they make such a delightful team. Visiting both cities on one trip promises an experience of two vastly different lifestyles. Two countries, two capitals and two different cultures are the perfect ingredients for an exciting weekend.

 Many thanks to Sarah Althaus from Rapunzel will Raus for the blogpost and coorperation.

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